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ac 15 and revit 2011

Anonymous
Not applicable
Hi all I really like archicad but every time see some Image of revit 2011 ask my self if that time to move to revit I hope that not come ever .but ac 14 shock me I hope AC 15 have free model ,spilt face ,good sun study ,good stair maker,new interface,pattern ,sweep,smooth roof , and more.
every time I hear some move to revit and never hear some one move form revit to AC I hope hear that
thank you.

curtsysbyface.png
91 REPLIES 91

Anonymous
Not applicable
Link wrote:
PS. Don't flame me - I'm just being jovial (and perhaps proving how a post count is not always a reflection of one's ArchiCAD expertise!)
Link,

3307 is nothing to sneeze at (despite the high pollen count around here lately). Of course I didn't mean to suggest that the size of you post count is a measure of the size of your...

...uh, ArchiCAD experience. Just that someone with a post count like Tom's probably didn't get there with a bunch of spam or novice questions

TomWaltz
Newcomer
Aww, it's nice to be remembered!

Yes, I'm now working at Bentley and working on my third BIM platform (though now on the development side instead of implementation). I can appreciate aspects of software development that I really didn't before

After learning all three platforms, I found something truly interesting:
Moving from one to another requires some of the same advice that I used to provide to users moving from CAD to BIM.
Expect things to be different. Some concepts and ideas exist in both places and different does not mean better or worse. It just means that you have to break a lot of old habits and learn new ways to do the exact same task.

That said, any time you go down the checklist, you will find features, functions, and tools that one program has that one or more others do not.

And heck, even with my post count, it's been 3 or 4 years since I've seriously written GDL and probably couldn't code a parametric rectangle right now.
Tom Waltz

JaredBanks
Booster
I've got nothing to add beyond Tom's comments, except to shed some light on post counts and usefulness:

http://www.theonion.com/articles/takecharge-cando-guy-makes-horrible-decisions,717/


5 years and only 250. what a slacker.
Jared Banks, AIA

Archicad blog: www.shoegnome.com
Archicad tutorial videos: https://www.youtube.com/shoegnome

Anonymous
Not applicable
I am currently using both Revit and Archicad about 50/50 although I have been with Archicad much longer, 15 years compared to 2 with Revit. The first 10 years with Archicad -v4.5 to v10 I think- I spent most of my working week doing design, development and documentation so I am very comfortable with it.
My first experience with Revit was as Mathew says, a management decision, and was not a happy one. A very large complex project in the Middle East with double curved facades and swoopy louvers all originally designed in 3D Max. All these difficult bits were done in Grasshopper and brought in. The problem was a team new to Revit and not enough horsepower (32bit PC's)

I now spend about a third of my time using Revit and with smaller less complex projects and 64bit 12gb PC it is fine especially in the early stages with concept massing quickly applying floor plates and curtain walling etc. You can work in a single 3D window, no need to build the model up storey by storey, sort of like sketch up but with data feedback such as GFA and NLA etc.

But at some stage, if the project is a goer, you have to get real with grids columns and cores etc. and this is where it is about equal with Archicad. Some things are better such as storey heights. Change these and all wall columns etc go with the new height. But stairs do not so these have to be remodelled. AFAIK only Generative Components can automatically gets stairs to do this.

Into design development is where Archicad overtakes as the parametric nature and auto-connective-ness of Revit can prove too clever for its (and yours) own good. Move a column and beams, slab and walls go with it over multiple levels (can be achieved with the marquee H command in AC). Managing the process can be a pain especially if ‘worksets’ and being used (Revit’s version of Teamwork) and less experienced users are sharing the model.

The Archicad model remains easier to deal with as the project becomes lager and more complex. I take my hat off to the BIM managers controlling large hospitals etc in Revit.

So for my own work I stay with Archicad because I prefer it but no longer feel I’d rather gouge my eye out than use Revit (as stated by ex-Archicad BIM Manager on the previously mentioned ME project, who had previously worked on the largest BIM project in the southern hemisphere, in Archicad)

Archicad 15 with concept massing? Yes please! (now on v14)

Anonymous
Not applicable
Harry & Matthew.

By this auto-connectivity or rigidity in Revit, do you mean that the actual room spaces or modules stay connected with each other?

Where as in AC its more freestyle with defined room spaces?

What about stairs in Revit, are they easier to design and implement than in AC?

Anonymous
Not applicable
I have not used any but the most basic stairs in Revit so I can't say much one way or the other about that. The relationship problems I have experienced in Revit are with the automatic component relationships, particularly in structures.

I have a fundamental objection to an excess of automatic functions in any software. If the software is going to make assumptions and take actions on those assumptions about how I want to work it needs to be correct very nearly 100% of the time and be very transparent not only in what it is doing but also in how to override the behavior.

I remember when OCR software was touting 97% accuracy as a good thing but that means that 3 out of 100 characters are wrong. That would be about 9 mistakes just in this post. If these errors are not easily discovered and fixed then the functions quickly become more trouble than they are worth.

Anonymous
Not applicable
I couldn't agree more. The main frustration in Revit is based on it's forced automation. Move a wall and another moves with it even if you don't want it to happen. Sometimes you find out about it when it's to late. And there is no easy to use manager of those automatic actions.

Anonymous
Not applicable
Yes, Revit has much more automation, as said both a good and a bad thing. To customise annotation such as tags (window, wall Id’s etc), floor level symbols etc is possible by editing the ‘family’ but is a pain so most don’t bother hence the uniformity of Revit documents – one reason large firms are taking to it. AC is much more customable on the fly, hence less stereotypical drawings emerge which is why it might suit individuals and smaller firms. More “Maverick” you might say

Saying that Revit can be customised and AC standardised by templates. Yes, mthd, rooms and modules stay connected and room tags, areas and schedules etc are updated if walls are moved. If a room is ‘breached’. i.e. there is a leak where a wall is no longer connected you get a big fat warning sign.

Even text is a family – no changing from ariel narrow to times roman on the fly- you have to edit the family. There is stand alone text for street names etc and you can write notes but cannot draw an arrow head line pointing the note at something- hard to believe no headers to lines. Also the standard Revit ‘library’ is limited.

Revit stair tool is a shocker, worse than AC and connecting stair rails to landing rails is no better so you don’t bother. I do all my railings later using the curtain walling tool to add handrails, posts, panelling etc. This usually works well with seamless stair to landing balustrade but is time consuming to implement and change. (This where I get the junior graduates to step in-BIM is more fun than flatland but there can still be tedious tasks). Haven’t tried the AC curtail walling tool for this that but might work also

Chadwick
Newcomer
Matthew wrote:
I remember when OCR software was touting 97% accuracy as a good thing but that means that 3 out of 100 characters are wrong. That would be about 9 mistakes just in this post. If these errors are not easily discovered and fixed then the functions quickly become more trouble than they are worth.
This is exactly how I feel about IFCs right now - I seriously wish these were more reliable
RA 2012 x64, Piranesi 6 Pro, Sketchup 8, Windows 7 Pro x64, Intel Core i7, 10GB RAM, ATI Radeon Mobile 5870

Anonymous
Not applicable
The connectivity are common in any parametric modeler. So if you think Revit is a nightmare, don't even try to work in Digital Project. You'll go mad. Fortunately, you can disable walls connectivity in Revit through unchecking a checkbox before moving an object. But it is annoying especially when you're accustomed to AC.

As for site and stairs, yeah, does are horrible in Revit. However, the whole point of the new massing environment and adaptive components is not necessarily for the Hadids and Gehry's, but for the basic day to day modeling like stairs. I've heard that the stair and site tools weren't approved for this release (typically Autodesk bureaucratic way of working), but some of this technology made it's way in Revit Stucture 2012.

I think AC is overhauling it's modeling kernel too.

Anonymous
Not applicable
Chadwick wrote:
Matthew wrote:
I remember when OCR software was touting 97% accuracy as a good thing but that means that 3 out of 100 characters are wrong. That would be about 9 mistakes just in this post. If these errors are not easily discovered and fixed then the functions quickly become more trouble than they are worth.
This is exactly how I feel about IFCs right now - I seriously wish these were more reliable
I know what you mean. Fortunately the problems are pretty consistent. I haven't had any random mysterious geometry issues. Just predictable (once identified) limitations in each program.

Link
Enthusiast
Hi Matthew

I'd be interested to get your take in the consistent problems experienced with IFCs, if you've got time to put a quick list together?

Cheers,
Link.
Get your ARCHICAD 25 Template HERE!

Anonymous
Not applicable
Link wrote:
Hi Matthew

I'd be interested to get your take in the consistent problems experienced with IFCs, if you've got time to put a quick list together?

Cheers,
Link.
Time... Yes I remember having some to spare once. I think I spent it playing Marathon into the wee hours.

I'll see what I can do, but please don't anyone hold their breath waiting for it.

In the meantime and very briefly:

1. Simple wall and floor/slab geometries convert very well.
2. Complex geometries are converted to BREPs (boundary representations) which seem to be very accurate as far as they go, but are not editable parametric parts.
3. Beams and columns can translate as fully functional parts though I have had to use a text editor on the intervening IFC file to tweak the process at times. The new IFC add-ins for Revit from Grafisoft help quite a bit but I have not had time to test them thoroughly.
4. The MEP add-ins to Revit and AutoCAD MEP seem to work very well. As I recall it is not so good the other way (ArchiCAD to Revit/AutoCAD though).
5. Materials can be made to translate well but require setup in the import/export templates due to differences in the way AC and Revit think about materials.
6. Doors and windows convert well but to get fully functional deliverable models I have had to run through them with search/replace techniques.
7. Tekla and Solibri are REALLY good at IFC stuff.
8. Anyone who hasn't checked out BIMsight is missing some fun.

So far most of what I've learned has been for the purpose of getting a particular result, so it's hardly a thorough investigation.

Anonymous
Not applicable
Just give us some better modelling options, bidirectional associativity and multiple view select and edit options please Graphisoft. End of story.

Anonymous
Not applicable
Back to the fray!

Krippahl has asked for an 'unbiased' comparison. I am yet to see this anywhere!

As a Graphisoft support tech heard when she asked me will I ever stop comparing Revit to ArchiCAD.... Um, that would require forgetting several years of learning.

I use both packages on a regular basis. I am constantly learning new functionality in both packages. I am considered a Revit master by many yet continue to discover intricacies that astound me. ArchiCAD still contains more mystery due to my limited, yet growing experience.

ArchiCAD is much quicker at generating 2D Architectural Documentation.
My most accounts the 'Shell Modelling tool' in AC15 will stop the requirement for AC users to employ Sketchup and similar for complex organic structures. The introduction of the 'Renovation' functionality will also start to fill a gap that Revit has offered for many years now.

Revit is much smoother when dealing with change (Revit is shortened REVise InsTantly). Learning how Revits change engine works is no more or less a behavioural study than with any complex software package. With the addition of 2012's 'Parts & Assemblies' functionality, Revit is now leading with regards to Constructibility, which is why we lean more heavily on Revit.

To bad mouth either product shows little more than ignorance. Persistent bad mouthing suggests fear. An interesting point I have noticed is that the ArchiCAD forums have a lot of Anti-Revit posts, whereas the Revit forums focus more on getting the most out of Revit.

Both tools have their pros and cons. Apples/PC/Linux, Betamax or VHS?

Matthew Lohden:- If you are to set up a blog, can I help be the balance? I think it would be a valuable resource for those attempting to fathom the differences and make informed decisions!

2.673c

Anonymous
Not applicable
An interesting point I have noticed is that the ArchiCAD forums have a lot of Anti-Revit posts, whereas the Revit forums focus more on getting the most out of Revit.


LOL I'll take the bait.............so why do you think that is?
And why do you bring that up?

Anonymous
Not applicable
Don wrote:
LOL I'll take the bait.............so why do you think that is?
And why do you bring that up?
I thought it might make some peeps think a bit, then focus on improving their workflows instead of whingeing about a software package that is clearly misunderstood!

HarryM, You can add leader line/s to note text (since (at least) 9.1), and have them boxed (2011).

Anonymous
Not applicable
There was someone who used to post here quite a bit and was a heavy Revit user. Does anyone recall his name?

Stress Co_
Advocate
Don wrote:
There was someone who used to post here quite a bit and was a heavy Revit user. Does anyone recall his name?
Wes Macaulay?
aka: metanoia
He's the AUGI Revit Architecture Wishlist Manager.
Marc Corney, Architect
Red Canoe Architecture, P. A.

Mac OS 10.14.6 (Mojave)
Processor: 3.6 GHz 8-Core Intel Core i9
Memory: 48 GB 2667 MHz DDR4
Graphics: Radeon Pro 580X 8GB
ArchiCAD 24 (3022 USA Full)

Anonymous
Not applicable
Stress wrote:
Don wrote:
There was someone who used to post here quite a bit and was a heavy Revit user. Does anyone recall his name?
Wes Macaulay?
aka: metanoia
He's the AUGI Revit Architecture Wishlist Manager.
Yes!

Wes used to post here a lot and I always enjoyed reading his observations about BIM and also Revit.

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