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archicad vs revit (in my opinion)

Anonymous
Not applicable
hey there, In my office I use archicad for everything...
6 months earlier I decided to try revit so i had revit 2011 and did some interesting stuff with it, and came upon these points about revit vs archicad

Editing of shapes/splines (e.g. Slabs, fills, lines….etc):
Archicad: very easy! You just click on an edge or node and a spline editing toolbar appears, in archicad this is done very quickly.

Revit: you go into a 2d editing mode where you use 2d drafting tools (offset, trim, line, circle….etc) to draw the spline or the shape you want.

Library parts Objects creation:
Archicad: I have to admit first that I had no training in this topic. Though it's very complex and knowledge-based and process to create an object or a lib. Part in archicad. Of course there are objects that you can create fairly easy like simple doors or so, but if you want to add parameters or functionality to you objects. There has to be programming and scripting done (e.g. creating something like the "Partition Panel "that has a number of panels and accessories on/off switches…).
Revit: I'm surprised to find that objects (families) creation in revit is something that is as easy as drafting... You just create a model, add dimensions, link/constrain them to specific parameters and make your object work like magic; actually, this is the most attractive feature in revit along side with it's 3d massing tools that is yet to be discussed.
I can say that archicad is a user friendly building modeler and non user friendly objects editor/creator. Whereas revit is a non user friendly building modeler (as to be discussed bellow) and a user friendly object creator/editor! Very strange fact...Eh

• 3d Modeling
Archicad: archicad's strong point is its flexibility. You can very quickly create a building model with high level of detail and finishing. However, there is organic architecture which is a zone that I cannot cross using archicad's modeling tools. Is NOT capable of creaing organic shapes whatsoever unless with a help of a 3rd party add on like cigraph's archiform.

Revit: wonderful!!!! I only have to say that I can play with these revit's massing tools in forever!



• 3d window 3d navigation
Archicad: 3d window use 'exploration' rather than 'zooming'. Archicad makes you feel like you are holding a camera and going through the model. There is the feature of 3d explore which I like to play with when I have clients in it impresses them and makes them understand the design better.
The 3d window uses openGL engine to enable the user to see raster materials applied to objects this helps a lot with the modeling and decision making.
The 3d modes are shading, wire frame, hidden line (internal engine only)
Shadows are enabled in openGL in version 14 which is great although I didn’t try it yet.
Vector patterns are enabled via the use of enternal 3d window engine.

Revit: Its default 3d projection is an axonometric view!!!! . I HATE axonometric VERY MUCH and I think that parallel projections are best suited for mech. Engineers or some industrial designers, its use in my opinion in architecture should be limited to descriptive views (sectional 3ds…etc). You can add perspective view via cameras which suks. To make it worse; the 3d navigation is via 2d zoom, meaning that you navigate in your model like you are zooming in a picture.
In the previous versions, the display of real textures preview in 3d window didn't exist up until version 2011 of revit, which had a big entrance via enabling not only the display of textures, but also the display of ambient occultation. There is also several display modes like hidden line, shaded with edges, shaded without edges
Vector patterns are present through all the versions of revit

To be continued………
43 REPLIES 43
Anonymous
Not applicable
• Library parts Objects creation:
Revit: I'm surprised to find that objects (families) creation in revit is something that is as easy as drafting... You just create a model, add dimensions, link/constrain them to specific parameters and make your object work like magic; actually, this is the most attractive feature in revit along side with it's 3d massing tools that is yet to be discussed.
I can say that archicad is a user friendly building modeler and non user friendly objects editor/creator. Whereas revit is a non user friendly building modeler (as to be discussed bellow) and a user friendly object creator/editor! Very strange fact...Eh
• 3d Modeling
Archicad: archicad's strong point is its flexibility. You can very quickly create a building model with high level of detail and finishing. However, there is organic architecture which is a zone that I cannot cross using archicad's modeling tools. Is NOT capable of creaing organic shapes whatsoever unless with a help of a 3rd party add on like cigraph's archiform.

Revit: wonderful!!!! I only have to say that I can play with these revit's massing tools in forever!

It seems the most asked petition in archicad is to increase the ease of use and capability for creating library parts
I hope to see something like archiforma or better yet something like objective in the next release.... Are you listening graphisoft?
Anonymous
Not applicable
yes revit family creation is way easier....

it would be great if AC had a "dreamweaver" like interface, where you could quickly switch between modeling tools & scripting.
Link
Graphisoft Partner
Graphisoft Partner
And since GS falls under the Nemetschek umbrella now, they could perhaps borrow a couple of (nurbs) modeling features from Cinema 4D!

Cheers,
Link.
Anonymous
Not applicable
Link wrote:
And since GS falls under the Nemetschek umbrella now, they could perhaps borrow a couple of (nurbs) modeling features from Cinema 4D!

Link.
yes it's all there for the taking
jespizua
Newcomer
Link wrote:
And since GS falls under the Nemetschek umbrella now, they could perhaps borrow a couple of (nurbs) modeling features from Cinema 4D!

Cheers,
Link.
Hi Link,

I'm sorry to sat that Cinema 4d does not support NURBS, they call it NURBS but C4D it is polygonal modeler so no trim, no fillet.....
What I would like to see is the Parasolid's engine integration within Archicad similar to what Vectorworks now have.

Have a nice day,

José
osx 10.14 | archicad 22 | cinema4d 18 |
Anonymous
Not applicable
"sdb" wrote:
"kiwicodes" wrote:
"sdb" wrote:
Yes in archicad I have the toolbox, so I can instantly click any tool. ....


Yes. Thats exactly why we have the QAT toolbar in Revit


yes i see they've updated that for Revit 2011, i'm sure that will help speed it up!


Except that it doesn't stick, or at least in Windows 7, the OAT toolbar get's lost....but that is only one dimension to workflow with respect to toolbars. Why for instance is the default set to copy when mirroring objects, why can you not move things vertically in a 3d view, or why can you not move things at all in a perspective view? Why is there no fence too or why do you have to go into "sketch" mode to work on a slab?
Lots of things unfriendly about Revit interface, the tool ribbon is the least of them.
Anonymous
Not applicable
galalhamadto wrote:
hey there, In my office I use archicad for everything...
6 months earlier I decided to try revit so i had revit 2011 and did some interesting stuff with it, and came upon these points about revit vs archicad

Editing of shapes/splines (e.g. Slabs, fills, lines….etc):
Archicad: very easy! You just click on an edge or node and a spline editing toolbar appears, in archicad this is done very quickly.

Revit: you go into a 2d editing mode where you use 2d drafting tools (offset, trim, line, circle….etc) to draw the spline or the shape you want.

Library parts Objects creation:
Archicad: I have to admit first that I had no training in this topic. Though it's very complex and knowledge-based and process to create an object or a lib. Part in archicad. Of course there are objects that you can create fairly easy like simple doors or so, but if you want to add parameters or functionality to you objects. There has to be programming and scripting done (e.g. creating something like the "Partition Panel "that has a number of panels and accessories on/off switches…).
Revit: I'm surprised to find that objects (families) creation in revit is something that is as easy as drafting... You just create a model, add dimensions, link/constrain them to specific parameters and make your object work like magic; actually, this is the most attractive feature in revit along side with it's 3d massing tools that is yet to be discussed.
I can say that archicad is a user friendly building modeler and non user friendly objects editor/creator. Whereas revit is a non user friendly building modeler (as to be discussed bellow) and a user friendly object creator/editor! Very strange fact...Eh

• 3d Modeling
Archicad: archicad's strong point is its flexibility. You can very quickly create a building model with high level of detail and finishing. However, there is organic architecture which is a zone that I cannot cross using archicad's modeling tools. Is NOT capable of creaing organic shapes whatsoever unless with a help of a 3rd party add on like cigraph's archiform.

Revit: wonderful!!!! I only have to say that I can play with these revit's massing tools in forever!



• 3d window 3d navigation
Archicad: 3d window use 'exploration' rather than 'zooming'. Archicad makes you feel like you are holding a camera and going through the model. There is the feature of 3d explore which I like to play with when I have clients in it impresses them and makes them understand the design better.
The 3d window uses openGL engine to enable the user to see raster materials applied to objects this helps a lot with the modeling and decision making.
The 3d modes are shading, wire frame, hidden line (internal engine only)
Shadows are enabled in openGL in version 14 which is great although I didn’t try it yet.
Vector patterns are enabled via the use of enternal 3d window engine.

Revit: Its default 3d projection is an axonometric view!!!! . I HATE axonometric VERY MUCH and I think that parallel projections are best suited for mech. Engineers or some industrial designers, its use in my opinion in architecture should be limited to descriptive views (sectional 3ds…etc). You can add perspective view via cameras which suks. To make it worse; the 3d navigation is via 2d zoom, meaning that you navigate in your model like you are zooming in a picture.
In the previous versions, the display of real textures preview in 3d window didn't exist up until version 2011 of revit, which had a big entrance via enabling not only the display of textures, but also the display of ambient occultation. There is also several display modes like hidden line, shaded with edges, shaded without edges
Vector patterns are present through all the versions of revit

To be continued………
1. as long as your camera is at the right angle 😉

2. Archicad = programmer, Revit = Modeller

3. Try to build what you conceptualise!!

4. Steering wheel
Anonymous
Not applicable
galalhamadto wrote:
first off all thanks for the quick replies.....

• User interface and work environment
Archicad: simple, descriptive, user friendly. I've been using Archicad since ver.8.1. I only had to watch interactive training guide to learn the program's interface. UI is organized into customizable toolbars and pallets with descriptive graphics. I don't have to memorize what this particular text box does, I only have to see the graphics near it to know its task.
Keyboard shortcuts can easily be made for every task and view in Archicad. There are no (can't-be-ignored) error messages, no hidden commands.


Revit: new interface changes introduced in Revit version 2010. Then it's been changed again in version 2011. I can describe this UI changes as disaster. I see myself switching between tabs multiple times to create something that is simple. This new interface increases the number of mouse clicks per task which slows down the process. I used to like the old UI better because it was simple (not as simple as Archicad's)
I hate this new 'ribbon' type UIs first introduced by Microsoft in Office2007 (Although I only like it in Office.) and I see many programs *unsuccessfully* trying to switch to this method. The most things I like about a program is the constant user interface that only have slight changes (like 3dsmax) although sometimes having big changes.
Keyboard shortucts is now changeable in version 2011 which is great. However, not every thing can have hotkeys (e.g. there is no keyboard shortcut for opening plan view or section view)..This needs to be fixed.
When I have this messages at the lower right corner, I feel like I's in some kind of a C++ interface (which does not enable you to continue when there is syntax error). Although it's descriptive and useful; but it's the most intimidating non-user-friendly feature of revit. It only sits there as an evidence that modeling/drafting in revit is no simple task.


• Design modeling:
Archicad: as mentioned not a super star organic modeler. But when I want to build more (down-to-earth) architecture; Archicad is my best friend 😉
Cannot import from other applications (sketchup, rhino, 3dsmax, autocad…etc) as a native feature. I can import .3ds files using 3dstudio-in addon. I can only import 2d from autocad.
I can have section views with segmented section line, though archciad setions/elevation are veeeerrrry slow to generate.
I can save elements settings as favorites.

Revit: excellent building modeler. I can model everything in my imagination. I can natively import models from other applications (sketchup, rhino, 3dsmax, autocad…etc) and have them somehow translated into building elements. This is the feature that I'm dreaming to have in Archicad.
I cannot have section views with segmented section lines. Setions/elevations are realatively fast to generate.


to be continoued
1. OMG.... The Ribbon exposes most commands to keyboard shortcuts....

2. Click the break symbol in plan view.... (replace veeeerrrry with 'embarrassingly'... Multiple thread vs 1 thread processing)
Anonymous
Not applicable
galalhamadto wrote:
• HELP AND SUPPORT:
Archicad:
-- HELP and Documentation: Natively installed with Archicad, you can find detailed description about everything; the nice thing is that you can find Interactive Training Guide for Archicad; which is rich and detailed and very important for you to learn about every feature in the program.
You can find detailed example files there. (Although they are the same for each and every version in Archicad); it would be excellent for newbies if there would be something like "Evermotion ArchiExteriors" You can find excellent training material in "Virtual Tutor for Archicad 12"


--Libraries and Object: installed with the program, complete library that has all the necessary object need for every type of buildings. There is some companies that offer extra content to extend the limits of the library.


Revit:
--help and Documentation: must be downloaded separately from Autodesk website. There is excellent books for revit to begin with like "Mastering Revit Architecture 2010", VTC training for Revit 2010 and Lynda Training for Revit 2010.

Libraries and Objects": Must be downloaded Separately from Autodesk website.??!! (I don't know why).there is Autodesk Seek website that I think is the best BIM content download website in the web, it is organized, easy download, has huge collection of industry standard objects (sometimes not only for revit; but for autocad also).I envy revit for something: I find most supported BIM models format is the revit's ".rvt".
1. Um... Help is installed and stored locally. The default is set to view on the web to accommodate updates and improvements. (help is clear and concise if the reader speaks average>good english)

I found the OOTB ArchiCAD help longwinded, cumbersome and disjointed. Training from Graphisoft and CADimage however was relevant and very useful. It appears that Graphisoft too have a need for "value added vendors". I guess also that what some find 'intuitive' other find backward, so it depends on how your brain works as to which explanation works for you.
Anonymous
Not applicable
As it far too often the case, people who attempt to compare 2 opposing, yet incredibly similar software packages, tend to show distinct lack of understanding.

I can rebut most claims of lack of functionality against Revit as I understand Revit inside and out. I can also embarrass myself with claims of lack of functionality inside ArchiCAD due to my own ignorance.

How about we set up a 'Real' debate with a few 'Real' experts and avoid any pointless yelling and screaming about how Chocolate is 'better' than Hokey Pokey....

I will volunteer for the Revit side, and learn lots for my ArchiCAD side...
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