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Wall angled to rise along its length

Anonymous
Not applicable
Is there any way to have a wall angled so that one end is higher than the other?

The only way I can do it to create a beam profile. This is ok as long as I do not want a curved wall, which I do .

Any pointers will be appreciated.

TIA
11 REPLIES 11

Dwight
Newcomer
curved ramp object should do it.
Dwight Atkinson

Anonymous
Not applicable
Hi Dwight, could you Please explain how do I use the curved ramp object as a wall? As a matter of fact I want to drop this wall on a curved ramp .

Dwight
Newcomer
Make it narrow and tall.
rampy ramp.jpg
Dwight Atkinson

Dwight
Newcomer
DO you need openings in this wall? If so, it is more complex:

you'll use ramps to SEO away the top and bottom of any curved wall.
Dwight Atkinson

Anonymous
Not applicable
Will give it a try. Yes I do need windows (actually, the middle part of the wall is all glass as shown in the picture above).

Thanks a lot Dwight; appreciate your time. Regards.

NCornia
Graphisoft
Graphisoft
I noticed in your signature that you have AC16 and this is a perfect chance to use the new Morph tool. I made a quick video you can reference: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qq1QnCI2xyQ I used a simple wall but you could create a complex profile that includes the glass as you show in your picture, then convert to a morph.

I did not include it in my video but you can classify a Morph element using the Element Classification in the Morph Settings dialog under Tags & Categories. This way you have some ability to schedule the wall and perform quantity take-offs.

HTH
Nicholas Cornia
Technical Support Team - GRAPHISOFT North America
ARCHICAD on Twitter
Tutorials
GRAPHISOFT Help Center

Anonymous
Not applicable
Wow! Nicholas. I am now beginning to understand the features of the morph tool.

Thanks very much and this has solved my issue spot on.

The video is very helpful.

Regards

S

Stress Co_
Expert
NCornia wrote:
I made a quick video you can reference:
Fine job Nicholas. Your videos are informative, concise and easy to watch.
Thanks
Marc Corney, Architect
Red Canoe Architecture, P. A.

Mac OS 10.15.7 (Catalina)
Processor: 3.6 GHz 8-Core Intel Core i9
Memory: 48 GB 2667 MHz DDR4
Graphics: Radeon Pro 580X 8GB
ArchiCAD 25 (5005 USA Full)

NCornia
Graphisoft
Graphisoft
Stress wrote:
NCornia wrote:
I made a quick video you can reference:
Fine job Nicholas. Your videos are informative, concise and easy to watch.
Thanks
Thank you.
Nicholas Cornia
Technical Support Team - GRAPHISOFT North America
ARCHICAD on Twitter
Tutorials
GRAPHISOFT Help Center

Karl Ottenstein
Moderator
NCornia wrote:
I noticed in your signature that you have AC16 and this is a perfect chance to use the new Morph tool. I made a quick video you can reference: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qq1QnCI2xyQ I used a simple wall but you could create a complex profile that includes the glass as you show in your picture, then convert to a morph.

I did not include it in my video but you can classify a Morph element using the Element Classification in the Morph Settings dialog under Tags & Categories. This way you have some ability to schedule the wall and perform quantity take-offs.

HTH
@ Nick,

Super video - perfect pacing, clear voice over, etc! Great example of some of the Morph features.

@ Everyone especially 'solitaire':

CAUTION:

As Nick said, there is "some ability to schedule". In fact, there is almost none beyond surface and volume. When you convert building elements to Morphs, you lose almost all of the "I" (Information) in "BIM". Do this only when you fully understand the implications on your model and scheduling ability. The solution presented by Dwight is fully BIM, on the other hand.

For example, while you can change the Classification of the Morph to be a "Wall", it no longer has a length or a height (or a radius, or any other wall parameters). If it was made up of composites or a CP, it no longer has schedulable skin components.

You can NOT insert a window into the Morph - something that user 'solitaire' wanted to do - so you must insert the windows into the wall before it is converted to a Morph.... BUT... once you convert the entire assembly (wall with windows) to a Morph, you can NOT schedule the windows - they have no parametric data any longer.

Lastly, since you must insert the windows before Morph conversion, when you skew the curved wall, the windows themselves will be skewed/distorted also. So, the only way to get the windows into the resulting mass, undistorted, is to cut holes manually in the Morph, draw thin/short walls and insert the windows into them, and then drag the fake walls with windows into the Morph cavity. ... and keep all these bits coordinated as you move forward.

So... very cool demo of Morph and well-done video, but IMHO extreme caution is advised before converting a 'normal' building element to a Morph.

Cheers,
Karl

Edit: typos
One of the forum moderators   •   AC 25 USA and earlier   •   MacOS 11.6.5, iMac Pro

Anonymous
Not applicable
You can make the curved wall in plan and then SEO it with two roof with extrusion. In this way you can have the "skewed" wll and at the same time be able to insert windows in it. Whisch is the purpose of the wall, isn't it.

By the way - great video, Nicholas!

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