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SOLVED!

Is it possible to smooth out the transition between the cirular oblique walls on adjacent floors

Isaac Newton
Enthusiast

Good time of the day, gentlemen

 

Might I ask you please, whether it's possible to smooth out the transiton lines between the circular oblique walls on the adjacent floors. In my particular case, I have a tower in the shape of the truncated cone. Its walls have to be devided by the floors, because it has doors on each of them. Apart from that different section of that tower must have other wall types on each floor. Various sections of it are represented with the fire resistant walls on each floor. Geometricaly, however, the side surface of the tower is smoth and doesn't have any steps. Each truncated cone on each floor has the same base radius as the top radious of the truncated cone on the previous floor, and they all have the same angle of inclination. That's what it looks like:

IsaacNewton_0-1680262023997.png

The same lines are visible on the elevation views:

IsaacNewton_1-1680262184404.png

Those lines also get plotted.

Could you tell me please, whether it would be possible to smooth them the BIM way, and if so, how to do that

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Solution

This will not work, or require workarounds (like, say, wall openings with zero-height infill walls for insertion of doors-windows only), if your door/windows project beyond the exterior wall face, but: what happens if you use a full-tower-height SEO operator conical wall, or shell, subtracting some minimal thickness from the outside face of the actual walls? (Which is, by the way, the way smooth stone wall faces were made; first you stack the blocks, then you cut them to form the smooth surface.)
[This is the mirror image of Barry’s suggestion of using separate walls for the outer and inner layers. Depending on the design there may be advantages to either. If the above works, which I have not tried.]

View solution in original post

15 REPLIES 15
Barry Kelly
Moderator

Walls that have their surfaces in the same plane, should join without a line as you would expect.

For straight walls this would be very easy to align them.

 

BarryKelly_0-1680488900373.png

 

For conical walls, they may be the same angle, but maybe they are not joining perfectly.

In fact if you look closely in 3D, even when you get the correct radius, the facets of the curve will be generated differently.

That is why you will see a joining line.

 

BarryKelly_1-1680489541296.png

 

I am not sure how you would solve this problem.

Apart from one full height wall, but that won't work in your case if you want different walls on each storey.

 

Maybe the only way to control it is to us straight walls instead of curved.

Draw circles at the required radii for each floor.

Use the magic wand, set to a particular number of segments per curve (circle).

This will give the same number of segments on each floor and hopefully they will all line up.

 

Barry.

 

 

One of the forum moderators.
Versions 6.5 to 27
i7-10700 @ 2.9Ghz, 32GB ram, GeForce RTX 2060 (6GB), Windows 10
Lenovo Thinkpad - i7-1270P 2.20 GHz, 32GB RAM, Nvidia T550, Windows 11

@Barry Kelly wrote:

Maybe the only way to control it is to us straight walls instead of curved.

Draw circles at the required radii for each floor.

Use the magic wand, set to a particular number of segments per curve (circle).

This will give the same number of segments on each floor and hopefully they will all line up.


Nope, forget that.

It is hard to get the exact radius (mind you I didn't try very hard) but you will end up with vertical joins for all of the straight walls.

 

BarryKelly_0-1680490225701.png

 

Barry.

 

One of the forum moderators.
Versions 6.5 to 27
i7-10700 @ 2.9Ghz, 32GB ram, GeForce RTX 2060 (6GB), Windows 10
Lenovo Thinkpad - i7-1270P 2.20 GHz, 32GB RAM, Nvidia T550, Windows 11

Your external skin seems consistent, so maybe that can be one wall from ground to roof.

Then add a secondary wall for the internal of each floor?

They will be divided by the floors so you won't notice the joins between floors - unless you have voids - but then they could be the same internal wall across those storeys.

 

Barry.

One of the forum moderators.
Versions 6.5 to 27
i7-10700 @ 2.9Ghz, 32GB ram, GeForce RTX 2060 (6GB), Windows 10
Lenovo Thinkpad - i7-1270P 2.20 GHz, 32GB RAM, Nvidia T550, Windows 11
Solution

This will not work, or require workarounds (like, say, wall openings with zero-height infill walls for insertion of doors-windows only), if your door/windows project beyond the exterior wall face, but: what happens if you use a full-tower-height SEO operator conical wall, or shell, subtracting some minimal thickness from the outside face of the actual walls? (Which is, by the way, the way smooth stone wall faces were made; first you stack the blocks, then you cut them to form the smooth surface.)
[This is the mirror image of Barry’s suggestion of using separate walls for the outer and inner layers. Depending on the design there may be advantages to either. If the above works, which I have not tried.]

Lingwisyer
Guru
@Isaac Newton: Apart from that different section of that tower must have other wall types on each floor. Various sections of it are represented with the fire resistant walls on each floor.

Just clarifying, your outer skin is constistant from top to bottom, but your inner skin varies by floor, hence the need to use multiple walls for your exterior?

 

 

Ling.

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Well, they actually have the same materials all along, on the inside as well as on the outside. It's just that some parts of those walls should be fire resistand and hence should be represented differently in 2D. However, those parts vary on each floor, i.e. that's not one and the same segment of the wall all along on all the floors

But, also, as I understand if I place the doors that have a certain elevation relative to the bottom of the wall, all the wall beneath that door gets cut out either. I have some doors in that wall, therefore, even if it wasn't for this division for the fire resistant and ordinary walls, it would still be necessary to divide that wall by the floors. Or am I perhaps wrong, and I could get on with a single wall somehow in that case?

Thank you!

The wall below the door should only be getting cut where it intersects with a slab under the door. So that does not prevent you using a single wall, but, if you are linking your fire resistance to each wall segment and your rating is not constistant vertically through your floors, then you are stuck with the multiple walls as far as I know...

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Self-taught, bend it till it breaksCreating a Thread
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Isaac Newton
Enthusiast

But as far as fire resistance goes, what would you rather suggest: to sacrifice its precies definition, and just apply the hatching to the respecive sements of the wall on each floor, or still, to keep them devide by the floors, and having fire resistance accurately ascribed to each segment, but instead having this outer layer shell that @Barry Kelly  and @Ignacio Azpiazu have suggested?

Lingwisyer
Guru

Is your fire rated wall identical to your non fire rated wall and you are just noting which ones require it or do they have different skins?

 

Do you need the fire rated walls represented in 3D?

 

Either way, I would probably not go with Ignacio's suggestion as I find SEO operations can impact performance a lot so it is best to avoid them when you can. The advantage though is that in using a SEO there is nothing extra to do when you modify your penetrations... so it might be worth it depending on your SEO load...

AC22-23 AUS 7000Help Those Help You - Add a Signature
Self-taught, bend it till it breaksCreating a Thread
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