BIM Coordinator Program (INT) April 22, 2024

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PLN->DWG Translator Font conversion

Anonymous
Not applicable
Hi.

I am having a hard time setting up a translator that will convert the PLN's text (which is in Helvetica Condensed and Condensed Light) into something other than Autocad's default 'txt' font? I would like it to convert our file's text into our joint venture office's standard Style which incorporates 'Romans' at a .75 width factor.

I noticed that that our PLN's text -that is currently in regular Helvetica-seems to automatically convert to Acad's 'Swis721 BT' (a Truetype font), which looks similar, but should also be converted to Romans. I also noticed that a layout file of ours which also contains Helvetica Condensed text, converted all its text automatically to 'Swis721 Cn Bt' (similar looking). I've tried to experiement with the Font-Style Conversion settings and the Template settings, but clearly I am not understanding how to do this. Can someone enlighten me?

:?::?:
8 REPLIES 8
Anonymous
Not applicable
Did you ever get an answer for this? I'm having the same problem -- when I use true type fonts, they all convert to Standard using the txt.shx font.
Anonymous
Not applicable
Jay wrote:
Did you ever get an answer for this? I'm having the same problem -- when I use true type fonts, they all convert to Standard using the txt.shx font.


Still working on this problem; the answer seems to be in programming the 'font conversion file'. Note that Autocad slows down a lot if the file contains a lot of truetype. We not only want the file to convert as expected, but to convert to a desirable 'shx' font in a way that does totatally screw up the cadd drawing. From what I learned several weeks ago; I think that this is actually possible. The conversion file (is supposed to able to) specifically map how a given font is supposed to translate. It even can (is supposed to be able to) handle issues of style, size, horizontal scale. I read the theory a long while ago, but I haven't had a chance to edit the file and try it out in practice; but I have to since some clients require editable files.
Anonymous
Not applicable
I finally found the answer for this. You need to make a DWG that contains nothing but the fonts you want to use in AutoCAD. Start with the ACAD.DWT as a base because it is basically empty. Once define, save the template DWG in a logical place, keeping in mind that you're going to reference it from ArchiCAD.

In ArchiCAD, in the Translator Setup, in Save Options you specify this DWG as the "Template File for Additional Settings". Then you go to Attributes->Font-style conversion and enter your style mappings.

If you are using the same True-Type font in ArchiCAD and AutoCAD (ie Arial to Arial), then the conversion works great. But, if you are mapping aTrue-Type font in ArchiCAD to an SHX font in AutoCAD (ie Tahoma to archstyl.shx) then you will still see the Tahoma when you open AutoCAD.

The reason you see this is because ArchiCAD embeds font calls in all the mtext and dimension entities, so even though they may be using the right text style, the font has been changed within the entity itself. To fix this you need to download a lisp routine called StripMtext from the web. You can get it at http://www.users.qwest.net/~sdoman. When you run this program you can tell it to strip out the formatting and -- shazzam -- your text and dimensions use the right font.
Anonymous
Not applicable
Thanks Jay! I've been trying to work out how to do that for way too much time 🙂
Anonymous
Not applicable
Outstanding job, Jay! I have never had the patience to figure out how to make this! (Being an AutoCAd user since R12!)

May I use your explanation to show my students why they should not use AutoCAD? 😉
Anonymous
Not applicable
kliment wrote:
Outstanding job, Jay! I have never had the patience to figure out how to make this! (Being an AutoCAd user since R12!)
I started on AutoCAD 9.
kliment wrote:
May I use your explanation to show my students why they should not use AutoCAD?


Sure, no problem. I'm glad I could help.
Anonymous
Not applicable
AutoCAD 2.something circa 1986, then to 9.

AutoCAD version history for anyone interested (or just wanting to poke fun). Nice to see that it wasn't until version 2.5 (release 7) that they added rotate, stretch and trim commands.
Anonymous
Not applicable
I like how you had to pay EXTRA to get dimensioning commands in 1.2.
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