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Light Sources 70

Anonymous
Not applicable
Spotlight Ceilign 70- I can't change the vertical angle of the spotlights . so the angle of luminance falls onto the middle of the sign panel.
Strip lamp 70- what is the difference between brightener and intensity? I've to switch the brightener to OFF and the intensity to 1 in this image. Also, how to eliminate the cone shadows on the walls from the strip lamp? I am assuming the strip lamp is fluorescent lamp.

Can anyone help?

ac7/usa/xphome
11 REPLIES 11

Anonymous
Not applicable
Hi there,

I know this isn't what you want to hear, but ArchiCad just doesn't do lighting very well.
While I can't help you with the library part which isn't working, I CAN say that the strip light only "looks" like a strip light. In reality, ArchiCad (and Art-Lantis, for that matter) can't reproduce anything but point lights.
Sorry!

Anonymous
Not applicable
Isid
lsid wrote:
Strip lamp 70- what is the difference between brightener and intensity?
The brightener is a second light source (a point source) in the same lamp, it is a way to get a more general illumination from a spot lamp source. Often the brightener, which is invisible, is placed below a ceiling lamp to give a wash of light back up onto the ceiling. In Art.lantis you would use global illumination instead.

The direction of the lamp is controlled by GDL so you can edit the angle if you have to. As Miguel says ArchiCAD does not do a fluorescent lamp shape.

Usually when I use ArchiCAD lamps I try to get one lamp working and then copy it around. Also turn off anti-aliasing and reduce the rendered image size to speed up the rendering while previewing the light levels.

I hope this is of some help!

regards

Anonymous
Not applicable
Bill wrote:
Isid
lsid wrote:
Strip lamp 70- what is the difference between brightener and intensity?
The brightener is a second light source (a point source) in the same lamp, it is a way to get a more general illumination from a spot lamp source. Often the brightener, which is invisible, is placed below a ceiling lamp to give a wash of light back up onto the ceiling. In Art.lantis you would use global illumination instead.

The direction of the lamp is controlled by GDL so you can edit the angle if you have to. As Miguel says ArchiCAD does not do a fluorescent lamp shape.

Usually when I use ArchiCAD lamps I try to get one lamp working and then copy it around. Also turn off anti-aliasing and reduce the rendered image size to speed up the rendering while previewing the light levels.

I hope this is of some help!

regards

Thanks Bill....what is the anti-liasing? what does it do to the rendering?

Thomas Holm
Booster
There's a guy called Dwight Atkinson who is also based in Vancouver, British Columbia. He has written a book called Illustration in Archicad, available still from Amazon.com (among others), I think.

Buy it and read every line. It's worth time and expense several times over, and will give solutions and answers to this and most other questions related.

Regards,

Thomas Holm
AC4.1-AC24SWE-25INT; OSX11.5; MP5,1+MBP16,1

Anonymous
Not applicable
lsid wrote:
....what is the anti-liasing? what does it do to the rendering?
For this sort of question, Google is also a very good place to start. I've checked - and you can even get away with the 'I feel lucky' button for this one

Of course, for google to give good answers you do need good spelling

HTH - Stuart

Anonymous
Not applicable
Isid wrote
...what is the anti-liasing? what does it do to the rendering?
In simple terms anti-aliasing is a computer method of smoothing the jagged edges between the pixels that form a rendered image, it does this by calculating an 'average' colour for each pixel. Calculating this 'average' takes at least 4x the time to figure out for each pixel (high levels of anti-aliasing can be 9-16x). As a result renderings are much slower with anti-aliasing (but look so much better!)

I am sure that a web search will bring up some diagrams which explain it more clearly.

cheers

Dwight
Newcomer
Anti-liasing is where diplomats have had a spat.

Further to Bill;s comments, anti-aliasing reduces the differences between pixel values to make edges smoorher.

It was suggested that high anti-aliasing values aren't necessary in ArchiCAD renderings unless trying to reveal fine texture patterns in high-resolution renderings.

Considering that the ArchiCAD Rendering engine is slow to do extra anti-aliasing [the kind found in the special dialog box] that it is better to do a rendering four times the usual size and reduce the image size using Photoshop's bi-cubic interpolation.
Dwight Atkinson

Anonymous
Not applicable
Dwight wrote:
Anti-liasing is where diplomats have had a spat.

Dwight says, Anti-aliasing reduces the differences between pixel values to make edges smoorher.
smoorher

Smoor
(v. t.) To suffocate or smother.

Her
(pron.) Wife

Dwight
Newcomer
Smoor - new definitions caused by typing error:

• to smooth and color at the same time.

• confection made with square of chocolate, marshmallow and graham wafer cracker in microwave.

• Or like that guy from "Jackass: The Movie" who goes into the hardware store with the toilets.

That is called "smooring."
Dwight Atkinson

Anonymous
Not applicable
Dwight wrote:
Or like that guy from "Jackass: The Movie" who goes into the hardware store with the toilets. That is called "smooring."
Must be the US distribution version. In the European version (JATM) the guy didn't make it into the hardware store.... ???

- Stuart 'way OT' James

Ben Odonnell
Newcomer
Or like that guy from "Jackass: The Movie" who goes into the hardware store with the toilets.

That is called "smooring."
Couldn't belive he did that Didn't think he had the guts to.. He proved me wrong
Ben O'Donnell
Architect and CTO at BIMobject®
Get your BIM objects from bimobject.com

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